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PROJECTS AND ACTIVITIES IN 3 YEARS FOLLOWING KUTCHCH EARTHQUAKE OF JAN 26, 2001
CAUTION TO OWNERS OF DAMAGED HOME IN KASHMIR
PAPERS ON DISASTER MITIGATION
CASE STUDIES OF SEISMIC RETROFITTING FROM LATUR TO KASHMIR -INDIA
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POSTERS FOR EARTHQUAKE SAFETY IN KASHMIR
MASON GUIDE - HINDI
POST DISASTER SEMI PERMANENT HOUSE BOOKLET - EARTHQUAKE AND WIND RESISTANT HOUSE FROM LOCALLY AVAILABLE MATERIALS
MANUAL ON HAZARD RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION IN INDIA - ENGLISH
APADA PRATIRODHAK BHAWAN NIRMAN - SAMPURNA BHARAT KE LIYE MARGDARSHIKA - HINDI
TRAINER'S GUIDE FOR TRAINING IN HAZARD-RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION
MANUAL FOR RESTORATION AND RETROFITTING OF RURAL STRUCTURES IN KASHMIR
LATUR REVISITED REPORT
BUILDING A HAZARD RESISTANT HOUSE - A COMMON MANS GUIDE
   
NCPDP

 

Providing sustainable technologies to reduce human vulnerability against disasters. Backed by 20 years of experience in transfer of disaster resistant building technologies including retrofitting of over 800 public and private buildings, construction of over 2000 earthquake and cyclone resistant buildings, and training of approximately 2500 engineers and 11000 masons in relevant technologies in various disaster prone areas of India.

   
CEDAP

 

Committed to developing, demonstrating and transferring technologies that are sustainable and culturally appropriate. Backed by 19 years of experience on development and dissemination of sustainable technologies.

 
ashiyana_title
 

A Semi-permanent House for the Disaster Affected in Kashmir
A earthquake and wind resistant house built with most easily available materials

 

Immediately after a disaster strikes come the temporary shelters that people put together very quickly, like a knee jerk reaction. Within a few weeks of that they build semi temporary houses called Mid-term shelters in which they very likely will stay for anywhere from a half a year to a couple of years until a permanent house gets built. In Kashmir the need for the Mid-term shelter will arise before long. People will need something where they will be able to stay warm and with minimum discomfort since winter is not too far away. Later when the permanent house gets built this house could be easily dismantled and all the materials reused in the extension to the new construction.
Using this design in Uttarakhand three organizations had built more than 300 semi-permanent houses for the affected people. Now more than 15 months after that disaster as people are getting ready to move in to their permanent houses many are refusing to dismantle their midterm houses since they are earthquake and cyclone resistant, and are spacious. They do not feel like a tin sheds, but feel like a house.

We call this house Ashiyana. This house could be easily made more comfortable by installing wooden floor and insulation under the tin roof.

  ashiyana_photos1
 

ashiyana_title

Total carpet area: 192 sqft.
Wall top storage : 100 sqft.

 
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Total Cost: Rs. 86,000/- (October 2013)

 

There are many myths about what such shelters should be. The past disaster have taught lots of lessons in this direction based on which a simple policy could be evolved. The points to remember are...

Tents or a universal type of pre-fabricated houses do not work in terms of culture, weather, livelihoods, lifestyle, natural resources, etc.
An external intervention by any agency could best be directed at strengthening peoples’ initiatives to build their own mid-term shelters by providing the supplemental materials and financial support, information, technical guidance, necessary artisanal tools, and artisans or labour if required.
At the time of planning the construction of midterm shelters Humanitarian agencies ideally should stay away from large contractors and prefabricated design, especially those using industrial materials. Use of ready to assemble structures with metal frame and infill panels must be avoided.
It is required that local capacities are recognised, respected and strengthened and adopt processes that are consistent with resources and capacities of the local community. The approach that promotes self-help with limited assistance from the government or NGO yields best results. For example agencies could distribute CGI sheets and timber where ever required. Stone for walling should be available near the site. Timber also should be available. Bamboo is another materials which can be used for under-structure.
The speed of construction is important, but not as much as many agencies think. A householder constructing a shelter by-oneself in a few days is preferred to a specialized crew erecting a shelter within a few hours. The former process takes care of peoples’ need a lot faster than the later. It is like one agency making 1,000 shelters than 1,000 families making 1,000 shelters.
Facilitating community driven process of midterm shelter reconstruction requires education and training of humanitarian agencies. Their present mindset must change for effective post disaster response.
 


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